Executive Health – Discover the value of exercise and a balanced diet to reduce stress

Following our executive health blogpost, Health and Wealth – How business leaders can find the balance Dr Bill Price and nutritionist Sally-Ann Creed continue their discussion, looking at two key things that can help business leaders thrive.

Sally-Ann believes any illness can be overcome through healthy eating and targeted supplementation. She also understands that business leaders have unique needs in terms of their health. This is because they are often stressed; find little time for sensible nutrition; have insufficient opportunity to exercise and get too little sleep.

Improve your executive health and wellness

Dr Bill Price: What is the true value of gym or sport and recreational training and aerobic and anaerobic exercises?

Sally-Ann: Exercise is vital to maintain executive health. If you don’t use it, you lose it – but apart from that it keeps the cardiovascular system toned and effective, keeps good cholesterol high and ‘bad’ cholesterol low. 

Exercise also improves mood, lowers blood sugar and insulin and improves immunity.  I use rebounding as an excellent form of exercise. Rebounders, like mini trampolenes can be leapt onto daily for a few minutes of fun exercise. These are easy to put in front of the TV, or better still – put outside where you can leap around in the fresh air!  Oxygenate the body and enjoy the sunshine and fresh air.  Or listen to music for 5-15 minutes of rebounding a day.

Dr Bill Price: Could you give us an example of a balanced diet for executive health. How can business leaders and managers develop a healthy diet plan for life balance and wellness?

Sally-Ann: Again this is very individual, depending on the state of health – but let’s assume the person is healthy yet relatively stressed.  Balanced meals – and especially when breakfast is never missed is always very important. 

A breakfast consisting of protein (such as an egg – which doesn’t raise cholesterol if it’s organic and free range!), some form of healthy fat such as olive oil, or even a tiny bit of butter on a piece of rye toast with perhaps some tomato and mushrooms are a good breakfast to keep the wolf from the door for about four hours. 

Executive Health and wellness

Oats with soya milk and honey plus a banana with some seeds or nuts, or even a smoothie made from fruit, plain yogurt, seeds/nuts and some lecithin are also ideal. The aim here is protein + fat + complex carbohydrates to ensure the body’s sugar levels remain stable. (The faddish diets where fruit is eaten on an empty stomach and carbs are separated from protein are hugely problematic in the long run, and destabilise blood sugar levels). 

A snack should be eaten mid-morning – perhaps a piece of rye bread with some avocado, or humus. 

Lunch should include some protein, healthy fat and carbs.  An example could be a salad with say tuna or chicken, plenty of salad vegetables and a good home-made olive oil salad dressing.  Some rice or a little potato could be added here, or even a slice of special bread.  (Wheat should be whole-wheat, never white due to the high glycaemic index – or choose a heavy rye or mixed grain bread). 

A mid afternoon a snack could include some nuts (just a few) with a fruit.

Supper could be steamed/stir-fried/roasted vegetables, some meat/fish/chicken and perhaps pasta/rice/potatoes etc – with around about four fist-sized portions of vegetables at least.

Sally-Ann Creed founded Creed Living which offers a range of branded health supplements in South Africa. She is also the author of several books including The Low-Carb, Healthy Fat Bible.

Dr Bill Price is and international neuroscience master coach who guides leaders of leaders to discover the dynamics of their individual and collective team wisdom through awareness so they can produce more intentional impact, profitability while perusing sustainable success.

al@countdowncreative.co.uk

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